Special Report: Drone Dilemma

Updated: Wednesday, November 20 2013, 01:47 PM EST
Special Report: Drone Dilemma story image
The use of unmanned drones in battle is a controversial aspect of the U.S. war on terror overseas. Now the issue is hitting close to home. An increasing number of civilians are buying and flying remote-controlled drones.

There is also a lot of interest from law enforcement. They want to use drones for high-tech surveillance. Something that's a big concern to civil libertarians.

The public deserves to know how much the government is spending on this technology.. how they're utilizing this technology.. and whether there's any court oversight over the use of this technology," said NC ACLU Legal Director Chris Brook.

There are people who fly their own drones here in the mountains and some airplane pilots who have safety concerns.

"If you add ten times more of that stuff, you know the chances are going to be ten times greater of getting hit. Or flying into it," said pilot George Danz.

Congress had directed the FAA to come up with a set of guidelines and a permitting process by 2015. But the agency says it won't make that deadline.

Several states have already placed their own heavy restrictions on drones ahead of any federal ruling. At least 30 others, including North and South Carolina, are considering legislation to limit law enforcement use. Or even ban UAVs altogether.Special Report: Drone Dilemma
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